Spot Drilling: The First Step To Precision Drilling

- Jan 16, 2019 -

Drilling an ultra-precise hole can be tough. Material behavior, surface irregularities, and drill point geometry can all be factors leading to inaccurate holes. A Spot Drill, if used properly, will eliminate the chance of drill walking and will help to ensure a more accurate final product.


Choosing a Spot Drill

Ideally, the center of a carbide drill should always be the first point to contact your part. Therefore, a spotting drill should have a slightly larger point angle than that of your drill. If a spotting drill with a smaller point angle than your drill is used, your drill may be damaged due to shock loading when the outer portion of its cutting surface contacts the workpiece before the center. Using a spot drill angle equal to the drill angle is also an acceptable situation.


Marking Your Spot

A Spotting Drill' s purpose is to create a small divot to correctly locate the center of a drill when initiating a plunge. However, some machinists choose to use Spotting Drills for a different reason – using it to chamfer the top of drilled holes. By leaving a chamfer, screw heads sit flush with the part once inserted.


What Happens if I Use a Spot Drill with an Improper Angle?

Using a larger angle spot drill will allow the drill to find the correct location by guiding the tip of the drill to the center. If the outer diameter of a carbide drill were to contact the workpiece first, the tool could chip. This would damage the workpiece and result in a defective tool. If the two flutes of the drill were slightly different from one another, one could come into contact before the other. This could lead to an inaccurate hole, and even counteract the purpose of spot drilling in the first place.


When Won' t a Spot Drill Work for My Application?

When drilling into an extremely irregular surface, such as the side of a cylinder or an inclined plane, a spot drill may not be sufficient to keep holes in the correct position. For these applications, flat bottom drills or Flat Bottom Counterbores may be needed to creating accurate features.

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